Moths

Moths are a diverse group of flying insects that are mostly nocturnal, have feathery antennae, and can be bigger than a banana or as small as a flea. Some moths can even easily be mistaken for hummingbirds! Do you know what place moths have in food webs and ecosystems?

Did you know?

Moth wings are covered in tiny scales and their antennae are usually feathery!

Did you know?

Many moths are pollinators and usually fly at night to gather nectar from flowers. But some moths do fly during the day or at dusk and dawn.

Did you know?

Some moths blend right in with tree bark, a camouflage that keeps them safer from hungry birds. Other moths, usually day flyers, can be very brightly colored.

Did you know?

Very few species of moths eat clothes or fabrics when they are in their caterpillar stage. Most moth caterpillars eat leaves, petals, and fruits.

Did you know?

Both adult moths and moth caterpillars are a food source for many animals, such as: birds, bats, spiders, frogs, toads, lizards and even hedgehogs.
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Heroes with bubble and flowers
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Gypsy Moth on human hand

Sometimes a species is moved by humans to an ecosystem where they don’t normally live. 
What can happen when a moth must survive away from the plants and animals they evolved with?
Click a button below and learn!

 

Light Brown Apple Moth

This moth is native to Australia but was introduced to many other parts of the world. It is now found in California, where a lot of the fruits and vegetables we eat are grown. Move the slider to see it transform into an adult!

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LBAM larva
Light Brown Apple Moth

Gypsy Moth

This moth is native to Europe but was introduced to the Northeastern U.S. in the 1800s. Caterpillars of this species can harm trees by eating too many leaves. What can we do to help?

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GM with egg mass
Gypsy Moth

Learn and Read

Stay and Play

Gypsy moth: Washington State Department of Agriculture.;  Light brown apple moth: Peter Maton, Flickr.com.; Gypsy moth: WJ Postma, Flickr.com.Light brown apple moth pupa: Todd M. Gilligan and Marc E. Epstein, TortAI: Tortricids of Agricultural Importance, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org.; Light brown apple moth: Pete L. Hawkins, blueyonder.co.uk.; Light brown apple moth on thumb: USDA, http://www.hungrypests.com/the-threat/light-brown-apple-moth.php.; Gypsy moth slider: Oregon SDA, Flickr.com.Gypsy moth adult: Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org.

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