Emerald Ash Borer

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Ash tree

Emerald Ash Borer

Scientific Name
Agrilus planipennis
Emerald Ash Borer
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Hero Aponi

These shiny green beetles love to live inside ash trees! Unfortunately, they dig tunnels through the trunk which kills the tree.

Aponi
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Emerald Ash Borer
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Emerald Ash Borer
The Beetle's Favorite Tree

All ash trees have leaves that are made up of individual “leaflets”. This photo shows one leaf with seven leaflets.

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An ash twig in winter.

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Ash trees have leaves that are opposite each other on the stem, a helpful way to identify an ash!

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Leaves and Bark of Ash Trees

 Green ash trees often have grooves in the bark, like the green ash in this photo. 

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Ash trees are often planted to provide shade on a hot summer day!

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Beautiful fall colors of the green ash tree!

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Trees in Trouble I

Tree trunk with many emerald ash borer tunnels under the bark.

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Emerald ash borers' feeding causes the top of ash trees to lose their leaves, and leafy sprouts come out of the base of the tree.

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“D”-shaped holes caused by emerald ash borers when they exit the tree. 

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Trees in Trouble II

Woodpeckers peck at the bark on ash trees to find emerald ash borers to eat, and leave behind light regions of flaking bark.

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Close-up of an infested ash tree, showing the leafy shoots that develop near the base of the tree. 

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The downy woodpecker is a natural predator of emerald ash borer. It is a sign that borers might be nearby!

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Predators

A wasp with emerald ash borer prey. 

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This wasp is a predator of emerald ash borer, so if you spot them nearby, there’s a good chance you might see emerald ash borers too! 

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Ash tree: Kelly Taylor, Flickr.Emerald ash borer adults, larvae measurement, ash with green leaves: David Cappaert, Bugwood.org.; Emerald ash borer and nickel: Eric R. Day, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org. Egg : Houping Liu, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org.Larva : Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry, Bugwood.org. Ash leaflets: Keith Kanoti, Maine Forest Service, Bugwood.org. Ash twigs: Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org. Ash bark: Richard Webb, Bugwood.org. Ash with yellow leaves: Steven Katovich, Bugwood.org. Damaged tree trunk: Eric R. Day, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org. Crown dieback, exit holes: Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org. Branch damage: Jim Tresouthick, Village of Homewood, Bugwood.org. Leafy shoots: Edward Czerwinski, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Bugwood.org. Woodpecker: "Downy woodpecker," Fox Fotos. Flickr.com.Wasp, wasp nest: Philip Careless, University of Guelph, Insect Systematics Lab.

 

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