Emerald Ash Borer

Aponi Star has discovered a special wasp that can help get rid of the Emerald Ash Borer... Check out the field guide slides below and scroll to the bottom of the page to discover more!

Printable Field Guide: PDF

  • Close-up of adult emerald ash borer, usually a little less than 0.5 inches (1 centimeter) in length.  Photo Credit: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

  • Close-up side view of adult emerald ash borer.  Photo Credit: Natasha Wright, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Bugwood.org

  • Close-up of adult emerald ash borer, usually a little less than 0.5 inches (1 centimeter) in length.  Photo Credit: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

  • Close-up of tiny EAB eggs, only 1mm in length.  Photo Credit: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

  • Close-up showing the second, third and fourth larval stages of EAB.  Photo Credit: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

  • Emerald ash borer larva, which can grow up to 1.2 inches (3 centimeters) long.  Photo Credit: Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry Archive, Bugwood.org

  • Emerald ash borer larva, which can grow up to 1.2 inches (3 centimeters) long.  Photo Credit: Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry Archive, Bugwood.org

  • Adult EAB on ash tree bark.  Photo Credit: Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry Archive, Bugwood.org

  • Close-up of an ash twig showing the opposite arrangement of leaves, a helpful ID clue!  Photo Credit: Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org

  • Close-up of an ash twig in showing the opposite arrangement of leaf buds, a helpful ID clue in winter!  Photo Credit: Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org

  • Leaf of green ash tree comprised of individual "leaflets" that are common to all ash species.  Photo Credit: Keith Kanoti, Maine Forest Service, Bugwood.org

  • Close-up of bark from a green ash tree. The furrows are fairly typical of all ash species.  Photo Credit: Richard Webb, Self-employed horticulurist, Bugwood.org

  • Beautiful fall color of a white ash, Fraxinus americana.  Photo Credit: Richard Webb, Self-employed horticulurist, Bugwood.org

  • Stately ash tree, commonly used to provide shade. Green, blue, black and white ash are all susceptible to EAB.  Photo Credit: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

  • Close-up of infested ash showing the epicormic shoots that develop near the base of the tree.  Photo Credit: Edward Czerwinski, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Bugwood.org

  • EAB damage is indicated by the light regions where the bark has started flaking from the branches.  Photo Credit: Jim Tresouthick, Village of Homewood, Bugwood.org

  • The downy woodpecker is a natural predator of EAB. Their activity on an ash tree might suggest infestation.  Photo Credit: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

  • Close-up of EAB galleries, the tunnels that they burrow into the wood of the host tree.  Photo Credit: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

  • "D" shaped exit holes caused by EAB, usally about 0.125 inches (3 millimeters) in diameter.  Photo Credit: Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org

  • Close-up of EAB exit hole showing classic "D" shape.  Photo Credit: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

  • Tree trunk riddled with EAB galleries under the bark.  Photo Credit: Eric R. Day, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org

  • Typical EAB damage showing dieback in upper branches and epicormic sprouts at base of tree.  Photo Credit: Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org

  • Researchers checking a ground trap for EAB.  Photo Credit: Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry Archive, Bugwood.org

  • EAB trap hanging in the branches of an ash tree.  Photo Credit: Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry Archive, Bugwood.org

  • Close-up of predatory Cerceris wasp that is used in EAB detection.  Photo Credit: Johnny N. Dell, Bugwood.org

  • Cerceris fumipennis with an EAB prey.  Photo Credit: Philip Careless, University of Guelph, Insect Systematics Lab

  • Note the single, broad, creamy yellow abdominal band, a feature usefuly for identifying Cerceris fumipennis.  Photo Credit: Philip Careless, University of Guelph, Insect Systematics Lab

  • Typical Cerceris fumipennis nest entrance.  Photo Credit: Philip Careless, University of Guelph, Insect Systematics Lab

  • Cerceris fumipennis colony at Rondeau Provincial Park, Ontario, 2006.  Photo Credit: Philip Careless, University of Guelph, Insect Systematics Lab

Scientific Name: Agrilus planipennis

Description: The adult is a striking metallic green with an iridescent purple abdomen hidden beneath the forewings. Reaches about 0.6 inches (15 millimeters) in length and just over 0.1 inches (3 millimeters) in width. Look for adults from June to August, when they fly in search of mates.

Native Range: Parts of China, Korea, Japan, and Taiwan as well as small areas of Russia and Mongolia. 

Introduced Range: First discovered in Detroit, Michigan (2002), EAB has spread to the additional states and Canadian provinces shown below.

Map Courtesy of USDA

EAB Risk Map:

FHTET EAB Risk Map

Map Courtesy of US Forest Service FHTET

Host Trees: Green, black, blue and white ash trees are the most affected by EAB but all native species of ash trees are vulnerable!

The Facts:  In its native range, Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) only attacks sick trees. However, here in the US, it attacks perfectly healthy trees and will infest all species of ash. The larvae feed on the vascular tissues between the bark and sapwood, a habit that interrupts the flow of nutrients and water required by the tree, thus usually killing the tree within a few years. This Green Menace has already killed millions of trees in the US and Canada and threatens important, natural ecosystem health.